What is the GCPI?

The Global Care Policy Index (GCPI) is a composite index that provides a single numerical assessment of a country’s support for and protection of home-based caregivers and careworkers who do the important but often invisible work of caring for the young, old, disabled, and infirm within the country. The GCPI incentivizes states to take an embedded economy approach, and recognize and reward the critical role that caregiving and carework within households plays in supporting the reproduction of society and the functioning of the economy.

This goal is in line with the 2030 UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and the ILO’s Decent Work Agenda which aim for a future where everyone is able to access decent work. It recognizes that paying attention to, valuing, and dignifying (paid) carework and (unpaid) caregiving is essential if a society wants to improve the quality of life of its people.

The GCPI is hosted at Yale-NUS College, Singapore; and is funded by Yale-NUS College grant G19-SG109, with support from Duke University.

More about the SDG goals

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries – developed and developing – in a global partnership.

SDGs 5 & 8, relating to gender equality and decent work are at the core of the GCPI’s focus. Below are specific SDG targets and indicators relevant to the GCPI:

  • 5.4 Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate
  • 8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value
  • 8.7 Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms
  • 8.8 Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment
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sub-indices

12

categories

107

questions

Index Structure

The GCPI comprises two policy domains (each with their own sub-index):

In both domains, the GCPI assesses a country’s social and labor policies protecting and rewarding family caregivers and paid domestic workers, to see how well these policies conform to the standards set out in key ILO conventions and recommendations. In comparing a country’s policies with ILO recommendations, the GCPI relies on qualitative assessments of the country’s laws and regulations that determine the level of social benefits and protections caregivers and careworkers can avail.

For Sub-Index A, which looks at social and labor protections for unpaid family caregivers, the key ILO conventions are:

    • C183 (the Maternity Protection Convention, passed in 1952 and revised in 2000)
    • C156 (Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention, passed in 1981), and their corresponding Recommendations (191 and 165)

Sub-Index B, which looks at protections for paid domestic workers including migrant domestic workers in a country, relies primarily on ILO conventions:

    • C189 (Domestic Workers Convention, passed in 2011)
    • C143 (Migrant Workers Convention, passed in 1975), and their relevant Recommendations (201)

Overall, there are 107 questions that make up the GCPI.

Expand the tabs below to find out more about each individual Sub-Index:

Sub-Index A: Protections for Unpaid Family Caregivers

Sub-Index A focuses on the policy protections provided by countries to help individuals with family-based caregiving responsibilities. This sub-index considers policies protecting workers with family responsibilities, and family caregivers more generally. There are six categories in all within this sub-index. The first four policy categories concern different kinds of family leave – maternity leave, paternity leave, and other forms of dependent care leaves. While these four categories are largely focused on employed family caregivers, they also include questions that relate to family caregivers who are not employed. Meanwhile A5 (“Flexible Work Arrangements”) and A6 (“Family-Friendly Workplace Policies”) study policy stipulations that require workplaces to be family-friendly environments and employers to be supportive of their employees with family responsibilities.

For Sub-Index A, which looks at social and labor protections for unpaid family caregivers, the key ILO conventions are:

  • C183 (the Maternity Protection Convention, passed in 1952 and revised in 2000)
  • C156 (Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention, passed in 1981)

Sub-Index B: Protections for Paid Domestic Workers

Sub-Index B focuses on the policy protections provided by countries to help workers who provide paid domestic services to households. This sub-index considers policies covering fair employment processes, decent working and living conditions, labour rights, and special protections for vulnerable groups such as underaged, forced, or migrant domestic workers. There are six categories in all within this sub-index linked to the ILO Domestic Workers Convention (C189). Expanding upon the ILO’s standards, the GCPI definition of ‘domestic work’ involves work that (1) is performed in or for a private household(s), (2) includes cooking, cleaning, housekeeping, driving, gardening, child care, old-age care, disability care, and/or long-term care, (3) is carried out by a person employed to do domestic work for some kind of remuneration, whether in cash or in kind, (4) where the worker is employed by a member of the household or a private employment agency, (5) in either a live-in or live-out arrangement, (6) and the worker themselves could be a casual, temporary, part-time, contractual or migrant worker.

Sub-Index B, which looks at protections for paid domestic workers including migrant domestic workers in a country, relies primarily on ILO conventions:

  • C189 (Domestic Workers Convention, passed in 2011)
  • C143 (Migrant Workers Convention, passed in 1975)

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